This blog was first published on February 14th, 2017. 

According to an article published by Musicweek.com, the 115th Congress is looking to modernization U.S. Copyright laws so that, “America’s global leadership in creativity and innovation continues in the 21st century and beyond.” This will be done with the reintroduction of the CODE Act – Copyright Office of the Digital Economy Act.

One of the first proposals to be presented before Congress is granting more autonomy to the Copyright Office and requiring it to maintain an up-to-date digital, searchable database of all copyrighted works. Other proposals include bills on music licensing and small claims tribunals.

The intent to overhaul the Copyright Office comes from the fact that the Copyright industry is responsible for creating millions of jobs and generating billions of dollars for the economy, yet the current structure is considered outdated and not aligned with the current objectives of modernization.

According to the Copyright Alliance, a non-partisan group that represents the copyright interests of over 1.8 million creators and 13,000 organizations in the U.S., “[m]odernisation of the US Copyright Office is crucial not just to those of us in the copyright community, but to the public and many others who rely upon the Copyright Office’s services.”